CPSIA problems – The problem Is NOT that we want to sell cheap lead-ridden stuff to defenseless babies.

I need to stop reading parent comments to news stories and blog posts about the CPSIA. I’m getting a little upset over comments like “those manufacturers begging for a change in the law just want to continue making a buck from selling their cheap crap to our kids.” OK, that was an exact quote.

First, companies do not force cheap crap on kids. Parents and other buy said cheap crap and give it willingly to their kids. But that’s really beside the point, isn’t it?

Nobody is saying the law is not a good idea. It’s just badly written and poorly thought through.

1. it requires expensive testing for lead on things that could never have lead. unpainted, all wood toys, for example. i do not think many parents realize where lead comes from: paint and dye. Unpainted wood? No lead. I don’t need to test it to know that.

2. though consumer advocates say that the toy industry had warning this was coming, I’ll tell you who didn’t realize it would be soo expansive: textiles manufacturers.

3. the testing is overly onerous. testing every item, post-production? that’s just stupid.

And here’s something. As a consumer, I feel like I’m being penalized for being smart about toys. We’ve trended towards natural products, all-wood, wool, fabric, etc. Handmade or made by super great companies like Haba and Selecta. We’re not big Plastic Imported Toys purchasers.

And guess what? I’m the one who’s going to get screwed over by this legislation. Because I’m not going to be able to buy them any more. If they even remain available, they’ll be even more expensive than they now are – because the makers will have to prove that their already lead-free toys are, well, free of lead.

It’s just frustrating that so many of the comments I’m reading out there in cyberspace are from people who just don’t get it. And I understand – it’s a law that protects our Children. It’s for the Children. Right?

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About sarahtar

Our Family lives in central Iowa. We are Christians, conservatives, and crunchy granola heads. We love the outdoors, photography, and lindy hop. Turn ons are people who are polite, honesty, and really good root beer. Turn offs are mean people and people who make my life more difficult.

Posted on December 21, 2008, in Regulation. Bookmark the permalink. 4 Comments.

  1. Thank you for spreading the word to your readers!

  2. And here’s something. As a consumer, I feel like I’m being penalized for being smart about toys. We’ve trended towards natural products, all-wood, wool, fabric, etc. Handmade or made by super great companies like Haba and Selecta.

    I go one step further, my first choice is always artisan toys. Do you know I have never bought a plastic toy? Never. Well, not until the boy got into video games when he was 16.

    We go to the farmer’s market where they sell these things. Saturday in particular, I felt like I’m starving or that I will be. I am buying WAY too much stuff for my young niece and nephew because I truly fear it’ll be all gone. I mean, they’ll fix this sooner or later but how many producers won’t survive to return? I have spent a fortune on my niece and nephew this christmas. I get something every time I go. Saturday I bought a matched raggedy Ann & Andy for each of them ($75 each). I fear it may be the last christmas. Of toys and clothing made by artisans anyway. I feel like stockpiling. I don’t know what else to do on a personal level.

  3. You gotta love legislation with the word “Children” in it. Congress people pretty much have to vote on it, because they know if they don’t some rival in the next election is going to claim they hate kids.

    Like Kathleen, I’ve been worried about some of the farmer’s market crafters too.
    Maybe if the industrial food distribution network breaks down fast enough I’ll be able to trade my organically grown veggies for local toys/diapers. 😛 If money isn’t exchanging hands, maybe no certification will be necissary.

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